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Month: March 2017

Vail’s plans for Stowe Vermont? Epic or Not?

For years I had been hoping Vail Resorts would round out their portfolio with an Eastern ski resort. Wish granted, but like all wishes – its not exactly as you’d dreamed or anticipated. I was hoping Vail would come in with capital infusion for a New England ski resort in need- say Saddleback that has been closed for two ski seasons, or maybe Jay Peak and Burke Mountain now in receivership after last season’s EB5 ponzi scheme and scandal. But no – Vail goes for Stowe… my favorite ski resort in the East. I must say Vail Resorts has excellent taste!

The $50 million price tag for Stowe is for the Mountain Ski operation, so ownership of the luxe Stowe Mountain Lodge, the Stowe Mountain Club, and the Stowe Golf Club remain with AIG. That makes for an interesting, perhaps complicated, equation. After all Vail Resorts loves its real estate and lodging revenue, right? They also own RockResorts – a posh collection of hotels, spas and resorts from Colorado to the Caribbean.

Back to Stowe.  Vail will include Stowe in its Epic Pass. Consider that a day ticket at Stowe is over $120, and an Epic Pass unlimited for next season is just over $800. Doesn’t take a math wiz to calculate the savings in 7 days, with bonus access to 14 ski resorts to boot! Vail Resorts Epic Pass is unlimited, no blackout dates for Stowe  for the 2017-18 Epic Pass.

So with unlimited access – the throngs will be at Stowe next season, including me! After all it is some of the best skiing in the East. Arguably Stowe’s epic snow conditions this winter are better than some resorts out west…lol to my western ski friends that assume we “ski ice in the east.”

Currently the Epic Pass is an outrageous deal, with full access to 14 major ski resorts Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Park City, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, and Arapahoe Basin, and Perisher Australia, plus four small regional ski areas, and next year Whistler Blackcomb – which Vail bought just months ago. The Epic Pass also gets you some free lift tickets in the Alps, 6 days of skiing in France which I just enjoyed at Les 3 Vallées, Paradiski, and Val D’Isere Tignes, plus 3 days skiing the Dolomites of Italy, and 5 days at Les 4 Vallées of Switzerland which includes Verbier, and 6 days in Austria at Lech Zurs, St Anton and St Christoph (the Austrian ski resort privileges require that you purchase lodging and pre register).

I predict lodging rates will go up in Stowe – now that it is a Vail destination. And Stowe is already pretty pricey by New England ski standards. I envisions Vail will make some changes, streamlining of systems and cut backs to Stowe staffing – as I witnessed at Park City last week. Hey, at least Stowe already has the RFID lift ticket technology so they can adapt to the Epic Mix vertical tracking app – bonus. I already now you can bag a lot of vert on Stowe’s Front Four – 10 X 10 when the lifts open at 7:30! Hmmm, that might change too…

So there will be pros and cons with Vail’s Stowe purchase. Now is the time to lock down the best season pass deals  for next season. The Max Pass, Rocky Mountain Super Pass, Epic Pass, Mountain Collective… it’s a ski deal show down throw down. A little healthy competition is a good thing, right my ski friends?!

By Heather Burke, Photos by Greg Burke, Copyright 2017

Visit Heather Burke’s websites Family Ski Trips.com and  for luxury resort reviews: www.theluxuryvacationguide.com

 

 

Extreme Sports, Even Skiing, With a Disability

How ‘Extreme Sports’ Can Be Adapted for Those Living with a Disability

Staying active is just as, if not more, important to those living with physical disabilities as it is to those without. Not only does staying active promote better physical health and help prevent further complications arising from one’s disability, but it also provides a boost to one’s mental health. There’s nothing like exercise and enjoyable activities to improve one’s mood.

But how do you get this physical activity? If you live with a physical disability, are you confined to swimming laps at the pool, or casually walking around the neighborhood?

Of course not. In fact, people with disabilities can participate in the excitement of “extreme” sports and activities. With the help of modern technology, service dogs, and various organizations devoted to helping the disabled stay active, you can put the thrill back into your physical fitness routine.

Image: Pixabay.com

Skiing

Your disability should not keep you off the ski slopes. Skiing is a wonderful activity that improves balance, coordination, and provides a serious amount of aerobic exercise. With adapted skiing, the disabled can experience the thrill and benefits of skiing while minimizing risk.

In fact, my best friend, who lost his leg in a car accident a few years ago, is still hitting the slopes. He is also passionate about getting others with similar issues to do so.

“Adapted skiing requires intense upper body strength, dexterity and reaction times, and can provide one of the most exhilarating experiences available on this earth. So it’s only natural that people with various bodily injuries and disabilities would want to find ways to start or to continue to enjoy this beautiful adapted sport,” notes Disabled Sports USA.

Adaptations include the mono-ski, bi-ski, and sit-ski. The mono-ski involves a chair placed atop a single ski, and uses shorter ski poles and upper body movement to direct the ski. Bi-ski involves dual skis, and is “for people who have intact lower legs but poor control of their extremities. This can include people with multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, brain injuries or spinal cord injuries.”

Canoeing, Kayaking, and Rafting

Some of the most enjoyable sports out there involve paddling down a river or lake, and they are perfect “extreme” sports for those with disabilities. Most canoeing, kayaking, and rafting vessels can be upgraded to group or tandem models, which allows those with disabilities to safely participate with the help of friends and/or a guide. Even those suffering from visual impairment can safely participate in watersports due to this.

Image: Pixabay.com

Rock climbing

“Rock climbing is a powerful tool in building confidence and reachable goals. It demonstrates how a successful climb is the result of fundamental teamwork. Climbing is not only a fun and challenging sport, but provides tremendous health benefits by improving strength and flexibility,” notes Abilities.com.

There are plenty of adaptive technologies out there for those with disabilities who wish to get into rock climbing. These include adaptive harnesses, ascending devices, and foot and knee prosthetics.

Hunting and archery

For those looking to add some firepower to their activity list, there’s always hunting, sharpshooting, and archery. Modern technology can assist those who are unable to shoot using traditional means, and various organizations provide opportunities and support for the disabled. For example, the United Foundation For Disabled Archers has been working for over 20 years to give disabled people the opportunity to live out their bow-hunting dreams.

Image: Pixabay.com

Wheelchair sports

You’ve surely heard of wheelchair basketball and wheelchair polo – both of which are rather self-explanatory. But those in wheelchairs can kick their sporting up a notch if they wish. Did you know that there are communities devoted to things like wheelchair skateboarding and even wheelchair parasailing?

Author

Travis  White is a proud member of the LearnFit team, which provides people with information on healthier and happier living. We are happy to have him as a contributor to FamilySkiTrips.com

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