DIN, three little letters with big implications, an acronym for safety when skiing. What’s your DIN? is a question oft heard on first tram at Snowbird or Jackson Hole. As if your binding setting determines your weightiness on the ski slopes. 9 or more is a source for bravado, like you are a bolder beefier skier than others set at a timid-sounding 2, 3, or 4.

Growing up, my brothers loved the mantra, “when in doubt, don’t come out.” They also enjoyed making figure 11s top to bottom, “when in doubt straighten em out” …which is now referred to as straight-lining. Now that I’ve matured, I recognize my brothers’ practices were quite perilous. I’m more concerned about safety these days…in my 2nd half-century.

My interpretation on DIN: you don’t want to be a yard sale, with skis scattered across the hill from a premature release, BUT what’s far worse is a twisting fall when you binding doesn’t pop but your knee or other body part does…

Here’s the deal with DIN:

DIN setting is calculated based on your boot sole length, age, weight, height and ability level, when your bindings are mounted on your skis. The higher the DIN, the higher the force required to release (toe or heel) from your bindings. DIN =  Deutsches Institut für Normung (German)

Your height, weight, age and ski ability are all factors in a proper DIN setting. Age is perhaps the key fluctuating component for skiers that’s not always updated –  properly calibrated among old-school skiers, who’ve always had a DIN of 8 for example, but at 55 or 60 should dial it back to a safer 6, say, to prevent injury.

DIN calibrated standards change at 50, and so should your settings. Of course you should also be honest about your height, weight and ability (lol)… and adjust when any of these change. It’s a ski shop form, so it’s not like your weight gain or shrinkage is going on Facebook for all your ski buddies to see.

I for one had a ski injury at 48, that could likely have been prevented if my ski binding had released. That sharp twisting turn should have caused my binding toe piece to release, but alas my marker bindings stayed on – tight, as they were adjusted to avoid a premature nuisance release. Lesson learned, I’ve loosen up. I recovered from that fractured tibial plateau, and now set my DIN per the appropriate age height and weight setting. Staying safe and alive at 5….

For the safest binding setting, your skis should be professionally checked annually, providing real “true” data of your actual weight (lol) height, age and ski ability, 1, 2, 3 and 3+. By the way, very few of us are 3+ ski level, that’s for extreme skiers.

Yes, your ski popping off prematurely is a pain, but not as big a setback as not releasing and popping a ligament, or worse… Have your binding professional set and checked annually. Better safe than sorry, “when in doubt, come out.”

See our Gear Guide to the  Top Skis!

Copyright 2018, by Heather Burke of FamilySkiTrips.com